Storify Feed Feedburner Facebook Twitter Flickr Youtube Vimeo

ROS Lboard

Ex-varsity students lose bid to overturn conviction

January 27, 2011

The High Court rules that the appeal of five former university students against conviction have no merit.

KUALA LUMPUR: The High Court today turned down an appeal against conviction from five former university students who took part in an illegal assembly at the National Mosque compound here, 10 years ago.

Stating that the appeal had no merit, judge Su Geok Yiam upheld the magistrate’s court decision to impose a fine of RM3,900 or three months’ jail against the accused in 2009.

The accused are Nik Norhafizi Nik Ibrahim, 31, Ahmad Kamal Abdul Hamid, 30, (both former students of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia), Zulkefle Idris, 31 (Universiti Teknologi Malaysia), Rafzan Ramli 34, (Universiti Teknologi Mara) and Khairul Amal Mahmud, 30, (Universiti Malaya).

They were charged under Section 27 (5) (a) of the Police Act 1967 for taking part in an illegal assembly against the Internal Security Act (ISA) at the National Mosque compound between 2pm and 2.15pm on June 8, 2001.

Su said the records denoted that the accused were present in a public place, present in an unlawful assembly of more than three person and refused to obey the police orders to disperse.

The accused, except for Rafzan Ramli, were absent from the proceedings today.

They were represented by lawyer Edmond Bond while Deputy Public Prosecutor Mohd Hafiz Mohd Yusoff prosecuted.

-Bernama


Comments

Readers are required to have a valid Facebook account to comment on this story. We welcome your opinions to allow a healthy debate. We want our readers to be responsible while commenting and to consider how their views could be received by others. Please be polite and do not use swear words or crude or sexual language or defamatory words. FMT also holds the right to remove comments that violate the letter or spirit of the general commenting rules.

The views expressed in the contents are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of FMT.

Comments