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Better your self-esteem

 | April 20, 2012

Your major goal is to improve self-esteem now and permanently. One way to accomplish this is by positive reprogramming of your subconscious.

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One day, a young lady came by my office. I shall call her Cik Hafidah for the sake of confidentiality. She was a shy and quiet person and spoke in a pleasant and intellectual manner.

As we chatted, I found out that she was a lawyer. Cik Hafidah had a “serious” problem. She said that she did not have the self-esteem and confidence to be a good lawyer like her more successful peers. “I am just not lucky and can’t be like them.” She felt she did not have that self worth within.

Self-esteem is one of the fundamental influences on nearly everything you do. When it is low, almost all areas of your life are made more difficult. Because a loss of self-esteem does not suddenly occur as a symptom, and it is often not head-on.

You may be extremely critical of yourself or be afraid to attempt anything new. You may even excuse any success you achieved by saying, “I was just lucky” or “It was a mistake,” or “Anybody could do that.”

This kind of self-depreciation or self-sabotage is not an accident as it does not materialise out of nowhere. It reflects a condition that is rooted in the past and one of the major causes of poor self-esteem is past negative programming that is the product of judgemental parents, teachers, friends, employers, etc.

All people are judgmental to some degree. There are those who serve up a categorical classification at every turn, one who decides what you do is good or bad, right or wrong. They use a one-dimensional generalisation. I call them the global labeler.

Of course, the list of labels vary from person to person, and sometimes the labels that are most condemning to you are those that seem to be most successfully buried and forgotten. But they are there, somewhere in your subconscious, contributing to the way you perceive yourself, influencing the degree to which you can exhibit self-esteem. You inherit the thinking style of your judgmental party. You acquire a critical inner voice that produces an internal fear.

Finally, your self-esteem may suffer from the way you perceive your physical self. This perception may cause you to miscalculate your overall potential. Instead of acknowledging our physical limitations and then mentally counteracting whatever may seem negative, you see your whole being as negative.

Your major goal is to improve self-esteem now and permanently. One way to accomplish this is by positive reprogramming of your subconscious. This is done through the use of hypnotic induction to gently assist you to rid yourself of past negative programming, improve your self-projection, increase your confidence and self-acceptance and change your perspective on your relationship to a given problem.

“See in your mind a whiteboard with the uncomfortable negative labels that have been given to you in the past. And now take an eraser and erase those labels from the board, just erase each one, wipe it away, it has no meaning for you…You are kind to yourself, capable, talented, and you no longer have time for negative thoughts or feelings, you fill your mind with positive ideas, productive goals, and you look at life as an adventure.”

Julian is a London trained subconscious specialist with Hypno-Station. He is Malaysia’s most renowned clinical hypnotherapist, media personality, columnist, event host and book author. He can be contacted [email protected]


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