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Najib – the Dream Peddler extraordinaire

 | April 25, 2012

Malaysians cannot afford to have BN helming the nation for another five years as by then maybe even Myanmar's democracy will be better than ours.

COMMENT

The voters’ roll for the upcoming 13th general election certainly cannot be used anymore due to the following reasons:

  • Some 240,000 Election Commission (EC) workers will be voting in advance and they will not be marked with indelible ink;
  • Cloning of voters’ names;
  • Double-registration of voters’ names;
  • No deaths recorded for Sabak Bernam, Sungai Besar, Hulu Selangor and Tanjung Karang but a check with the National Registration Department shows otherwise;
  • Selangor alone has 300,000 dubious voters, Perak has over 50,000, Penang over 35,000, even the remote parliamentary seat of Tumpat in Kelantan currently held by PAS’ Kamaruddin Jaffar has over 10,000 dubious voters and all these cases are just the ones detected. What about those undetected?
  • More than 1,000 voters over the age of 100 with one voter aged 153;
  • Voters with suspicious and nonsensical names like “Kampung Baru” and “Balai Polis Kerinchi”, located in the parliamentary seats of Titiwangsa (PAS) and Lembah Pantai (PKR).

Besides the above reasons, one of the recent amendments to the Election Offences Act 1954 (Amendment 2012), which were bulldozed through in Parliament on April 19, states that party representatives are not allowed to check the voter rolls together with the EC representatives. This will certainly enable EC to do all sorts of hanky-panky and dirty work with the voter rolls.

Certainly, the EC cannot be trusted to run a clean and fair election. The Bersih 3.0 sit-in on April 28 is a call to the government to run a clean and fair election, but if the government still ignores the demands of the rakyat, then the government is certainly against the rakyat.

Best chance to change

Thus, it is the turn of the rakyat to sack the government of the day but the problem is compounded further by the dirty voter rolls.

And that is why the government is crushing the opposition Pakatan Rakyat. So that Pakatan cannot provide the check and balance, which is so vital to ensure that there is a vibrant democracy and that there is no hanky-panky in the government administration.

Recall the Operation Lalang in 1987. After that, it took 21 years for the opposition to rise again and only in 2008 was the opposition strong enough to challenge Barisan Nasional. If Pakatan were to be crushed by BN, it is doubtful if it can ever rise again. Thus this is the best chance to go for change.

It looks likely that there will never be another opportunity again. At least not in our lifetime for those above 40 and as for the youngsters, the future looks uncertain with BN’s plundering ways.

Umno is now using the race card to the hilt to obtain the Malay votes. Everyone must work together for the good of all. It is not the time to think of the interests of one’s race.

For the Indians who are impatient and have many grouses, they must realise that they have to give time to Pakatan to put right all those 55 years of BN mistakes. It is a Herculean task and the problems of the Indian community cannot be solved in just a few years.

After 2008, there are also more Indian MPs in Parliament than during BN’s age of might and so the Indians must take note of this and be encouraged by this new beginning and move from here to give support to Pakatan.

If the Indians continue to be hoodwinked by BN, then their lot will still be oppressed as the foreign workers are getting blue MyKad faster than the Indians who have stayed here for more than 30 or 40 years.

It is time for a change

It is time to go for change as Malaysia is already left far behind by Singapore which has no natural resources. Another five more years under BN will see Malaysia being booted back into the Stone Age.

PAS is constantly making reports of BN giving instant citizenship to illegals and to foreign workers and yet the government is turning a blind eye and deaf ear to these reports.

This is a clear indication that the government does not respect the rakyat. Does this not speak volume of Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak’s Government Transformation Programme (GTP)?

What sort of a GTP and Economic Transformation Programme (ETP) is it when massive low-skilled foreign labour is imported while our own Malaysians are jobless? In Gelang Patah in Johor, many shoplots have been converted to become hostels for the foreign workers.

The massive intake of low-skilled foreign labour is only enabling Malaysia to be stuck in the low-income trap although it is a perfect source of votes for BN.

And speaking of income, whatever happened to the minimum wage policy and the Royal Commission of Inquiry (RCI) to look into the “IC Project” in Sabah?

Najib is good at ignoring issues that he is uncomfortable with. We should not be duped by Najib’s sweet-talk without solid substance. So far, he and other BN leaders have worked terribly hard in bad-mouthing Pakatan.

The promise of achieving Vision 2020 and a high-income nation is all about building castles in the air – stories crafted by Najib the Dream Peddler extraordinaire in an effort to dupe the rakyat.

PAS Kuala Selangor MP Dzulkefly Ahmad has mentioned that most of the projects planned under the ETP may not come into fruition after all because it is only on paper and can easily be cancelled via the excuse of “bad global economic climate.”

So far, only the MRT is a concrete project and that too because our public transport is in the doldrums and befitting the status of a third-world country.

Malaysians cannot afford to have BN helming the nation for another five years as by then maybe even Myanmar’s democracy will be better than ours. Hope is dim, and the light at the end of the tunnel is fading.

Selena Tay is a FMT columnist.


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