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Shock! Horror! Nothing for Father’s Day?

 | June 18, 2017

Fathers deserve the same recognition as mothers for their daily sacrifices, hard work, dedication and tough ‘dad’ love.

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DadDid you know that most Malaysian fathers, at least according to a survey conducted by HomeAway, do not receive presents for Father’s Day?

Strange but somehow true that more than 900 people in Malaysia, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Singapore and Taiwan put more effort into Mother’s Day celebrations.

Fathers, guilt-tripped by constant reminders of the pain, anguish and suffering of childbirth, find themselves with little or no choice but to shower mums with gratitude and gifts on their special day, failing which they are likely to endure episodes of close encounters of the “silent treatment” kind.

“Well-trained” dads recognise all too well the telltale signs of the “No, nothing’s wrong” response of their wives, knowing it invariably means something’s terribly wrong and they’re the cause of it.

However fathers deserve the same recognition as mothers despite not having to plod through nine months looking like beached whales, losing all semblance of a hip-to-waist ratio or sporting milk-gorged breasts enough to feed a battalion of babies. Let’s not forget the long bouts of sleep deprivation once the bundles of joy bounce into their lives.

As the saying goes, as much as the big things you do are important, the small, simple things are what your child will remember for the rest of their lives.

So, not wanting our Malaysian fathers to be deprived of the love, appreciation and gratitude they so rightly deserve, here is a selection of songs honouring their daily sacrifices, their hard work, their dedication and their tough “dad” love.

Besides, shouldn’t every day be Father’s Day?

1. Papa by Paul Anka

One of the songs from Anka’s 1974 album, this is about the life of a hard-working, loving father. The Canadian-American singer sings about his hopes that his own children think of him the way he thinks of his father.

2. My Father’s Eyes by Eric Clapton

Inspired by the fact that Clapton never met his father, who died in 1985, “My Father’s Eyes” also refers to Clapton’s son Conor, who tragically died at age four after falling from an apartment window.

“In it I tried to describe the parallel between looking in the eyes of my son, and the eyes of the father that I never met, through the chain of our blood”, said Clapton in his autobiography.

3. Pinggiran Syurga by Wan Imar Izzat

“God, give me the strength to hear the sighs of my mother praying. Since You called my father home, hearts broke as we accepted this fate.”

“Pinggiran Syurga”, was performed by Wan Imar Izzat, the son of the late MP Wan Khairil Anuar Wan Ahmad, former MP for Kuala Kangsar.

The video was released by KRU Music Sdn Bhd on their official YouTube and Facebook accounts a few days before Father’s Day last year.

The video included photos of Wan Imar Izzat’s mother, Mastura Mohd Yazid, in the days following the death of his father in a helicopter crash in Sebuyau, Sarawak, on May 5.

The video ends with Wan Imar Izzat wishing everyone a Happy Father’s Day, telling viewers never to take their fathers for granted.

Honouring dead MP father with music video

4. Just the Two of Us by Will Smith

The music video begins with Smith playing with his son, Trey.

Before the song starts, Trey says, “Now, dad, this is a very sensitive subject.”

The remainder of the video features clips of fathers with their children, including Smith playing with Trey, and other celebrity fathers, including Babyface, Brian McKnight, Magic Johnson and the late Muhammad Ali (whom Smith later played in a 2001 biopic).

5. Dance with My Father by Luther Vandross

Released in 2003, this song was a tribute to his father, Luther Vandross Sr, who died due to complications from diabetes. The heart touching lyrics recall Vandross’ childhood memories of his father, who used to dance with him and his mother.

6. The Living Years by Mike + The Mechanics

“The Living Years” is a 1988 ballad written by Mike Rutherford and B A Robertson, and is about a son’s regret over unresolved conflicts with his now deceased father. Say it loud, say it clear.

Every generation
Blames the one before
And all of their frustrations
Come beating on your door

I know that I’m a prisoner
To all my Father held so dear
I know that I’m a hostage
To all his hopes and fears
I just wish I could have told him in the living years

Crumpled bits of paper
Filled with imperfect thoughts
Stilted conversations
I’m afraid that’s all we’ve got

You say you just don’t see it
He says it’s perfect sense
You just can’t get agreement
In this present tense
We all talk a different language
Talking in defence

Say it loud, say it clear
You can listen as well as you hear
It’s too late when we die
To admit we don’t see eye to eye

So we open up a quarrel
Between the present and the past
We only sacrifice the future
It’s the bitterness that lasts

So don’t yield to the fortunes
You sometimes see as fate
It may have a new perspective
On a different day
And if you don’t give up, and don’t give in
You may just be OK.

Say it loud, say it clear
You can listen as well as you hear
It’s too late when we die
To admit we don’t see eye to eye

So we open up a quarrel
Between the present and the past
We only sacrifice the future
It’s the bitterness that lasts

So don’t yield to the fortunes
You sometimes see as fate
It may have a new perspective
On a different day
And if you don’t give up, and don’t give in
You may just be okay

So say it loud, say it clear (oh say it clear)
You can listen as well as you hear
Because it’s too late, it’s too late (it’s too late) when we die (oh when we die)
To admit we don’t see eye to eye

I wasn’t there that morning
When my Father passed away
I didn’t get to tell him
All the things I had to say

I think I caught his spirit
Later that same year
I’m sure I heard his echo
In my baby’s new born tears
I just wish I could have told him in the living years

songfacts.com


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