Cop tells murder trial she received call on fire at Cradle Fund chief’s house

Former police photographer Shafie Abd Aziz, who took pictures of the exhumation process, with Jamaliah Osman, who received a call on the fire.

SHAH ALAM: A Petaling Jaya district police officer told the Cradle Fund CEO Nazrin Hassan’s murder trial today about receiving a call saying a house was on fire.

Jamaliah Osman, who works at the control centre, said that a caller with the name ”Chung Shan Hui” called at 1pm on June 14, 2018, and said Nazrin’s house was on fire.

She said she did not take details of Chung, such as the identity card or home address.

“We receive a lot of phone calls at the call centre every day.

“Most of the people who call do not want to give their personal details,” she said when asked by deputy public prosecutor Noor Marwani Abdul Halim on the reason for not getting the caller’s details.

To a question by lawyer LS Leonard, representing Nazrin’s wife Samirah Muzaffar and two teenagers, on whether Chung had said he or she had witnessed the fire, Jamaliah said “yes”.

Samirah and the two boys are accused of murdering Nazrin on June 14. Another suspect in the murder, Indonesian national Eka Wahyu Lestari, is still at large.

Samirah Muzaffar is charged with the murder of her husband Nazrin Hassan.

Jamaliah said the call centre’s system showed firemen were on their way to Nazrin’s house.

“I asked a police patrol car to go to the house as we were worried there may be criminal elements at the scene,” she said when asked by Leonard on why she ordered a police patrol car to Nazrin’s house.

Meanwhile, former police photographer Shafie Abd Aziz told the High Court that the investigating officer, Nizam Daud, asked him to take pictures for the exhumation process of Nazrin’s remains and also during the second post-mortem.

Shafie said he took a total of 112 pictures from Oct 8, 2018 to Oct 15, 2018, from the day Nazrin’s remains were exhumed until the remains were reburied.

“This is my first time taking pictures for an exhumation process and post-mortem,” he said, when asked by Samirah’s lawyer, Muhammad Shafee Abdullah, on his experience in taking part in both the exhumation and autopsy processes.

However, Shafie said he did not know the names or the individuals present at the University Malaya Medical Centre mortuary when the second post-mortem was conducted for two days.

“I was focusing more on the remains.”

The hearing continues before High Court judge Ab Karim Ab Rahman on Sept 27.