Why still no closure to gay sex video probe?

It has been more than a month since the police commenced investigations to determine the authenticity of the gay sex video clips allegedly involving Mohamed Azmin Ali.

Until now, there is still no closure to the case.

Police chief Abdul Hamid Bador said the probe would be done without fear or favour.

But it was also he who confidently announced that Low Taek Jho or Jho Low would be caught soon and brought back to Malaysia to face justice. This announcement was made with little or no qualifications whatsoever. Hamid also admitted that the international protocol for bringing Jho Low back is quite delicate.

When he was appointed as the inspector-general, Hamid gave a solemn pledge of a more efficient police force under his stewardship, one with unwavering commitment to the rule of law.

He said there would be zero tolerance for corruption within the force, and announced a crusade against illegal gambling, prostitution and related vices.

People were happy, hopeful that at long last we had a top cop who was willing to walk the talk.

So it is most perplexing that nothing significant has taken place in both the gay sex videos and Jho Low cases.

Is this a case of empty talk? Or a wishful cop with sound and fury, signifying nothing?

People find it difficult to understand why it is taking the police so long to wrap up the case when many other forensic experts have long concluded their findings.

Are there hidden hands interfering with the investigations? Or are the authorities hoping the public will have a short memory?

The prime minister has not shed new light on the matter beyond his earlier statement that the whole thing is just a dirty political conspiracy against Azmin. Surely, both Azmin and his critics deserve definitive answers on the matter.

Everybody wants to know the truth, the unvarnished truth. Justice has to be done and seen to be done for us to have faith in our legal system.

The PM holds the ultimate responsibility for telling the people the results of the investigations. The police chief is duty-bound to complete the investigations in a transparent and accountable manner.

The public must be convinced that there is no attempt at any cover-up.

This case must be the biggest test for Mahathir since he returned to the PM’s post. It is also an inconvenient test, as it involves one of his most trusted lieutenants in the Cabinet, one who according to some quarters will be groomed to be the next PM at the expense of Anwar Ibrahim.

How well he resolves this problem will influence what people think of his commitment to the rule of law, and whether he has changed from his old Machiavellian politics.

The home minister, too, cannot shirk his responsibility as the case falls under his ministry and portfolio.

In the past, cases of similar nature were pursued mercilessly. Trials were concluded hastily, and allegations of political conspiracy fell on deaf ears.

Now, Mahathir has a chance to show the world that there will be no double standards under him.

A great leader does not lead people by what he says to them; he leads by example and what he does. True leaders must walk their talk and do what they preach.

It would not be right for Mahathir or Pakatan Harapan (PH) to dismiss the rumblings on the ground as nothing more than voices against Azmin.

PH must start responding to the legitimate expectations of the people before it is too late.

We do not want to see open defiance against a PM whom we know is generally well-loved by the majority of Malaysians.

Any leadership change has to be managed properly and wisely by the key stakeholders of the nation, to reflect the popular will of the people so that we are left with as little collateral damage as possible.

The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of FMT.