Raise salaries of lower-ranked police, says IGP

KUALA LUMPUR: The salaries of lower-ranked members of the police – sergeants and below – are low and not enough to cover the cost of living, especially those stationed in cities, says Inspector-General of Police Abdul Hamid Bador.

“Only by raising the salaries that the risk of corruption can be reduced and other temptations to commit crimes (to earn money) can also be minimised,” he said.

“I ask the government to reconsider, (in line with what) is already enjoyed by policemen in Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, New Zealand, Australia and in other developed countries,” Hamid said in an interview with Bernama.

Salaries, logistics and requirements of the lower-ranked will be given priority in efforts to enhance the integrity of the police force.

He hoped that the government would consider that the Royal Malaysia Police were entrusted with great and equally dangerous authority and power.

“When they don’t get the just rewards, the tendency to commit crime is wide open,” he said.

Hamid said the current strength of the force was adequate for the time being and all posts filled by the Public Service Department were also sufficient.

“I understand the government’s (financial) situation at this time but security business is not cheap … I appeal to the government to provide more allocation and InsyaAllah (God willing) as the IGP I will work to ensure that there will be no deviations in the provisions allocated,” he said.

‘Shoes and uniforms did not reach police officers and personnel’

Hamid said earlier that there had been talk that allocations did not reach the target, and there were also allegations of irregularities at the state and contingent levels.

“Shoes and uniform (from the allocation) did not reach police officers and personnel that they are forced to use their own money to cover the costs and the system also requires them to submit the receipts so that they can claim for reimbursement,” he said.

Recognising the needs of the lower ranked policemen, he said he would update the logistics and based on his visits thus far he found that there were police stations in dilapidated conditions.

During his visit to the Tanah Merah police station (after Port Dickson, Negeri Sembilan) which has 10 police personnel, he saw that the police quarters to house four families were in dire need of repairs.

“By right, the repair works shouldn’t be that costly, compared to RM300 per month (RM3,600 a year) of house allowance for each family that the government is forced to spend … and that’s only house allowance.”

He said police personnel living in rented accommodation faced challenges due to their irregular working hours as they had to fork out their own money when using their own vehicles to commute to and from the police station.