MH370 pilot ‘gave hint of plane’s location in family photo’, says report

People view the fragment of a plane, said to be from MH370, which disappeared while en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in March 2014. (Bernama pic)

PETALING JAYA: An aeronautical engineer has claimed that MH370’s pilot provided a clue as to where he would take the plane in a family photograph published after the plane’s disappearance.

One of the aviation world’s greatest mysteries, MH370 disappeared on March 8, 2014 en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 passengers and crew on board, all of whom remain unaccounted for.

Speaking to Britain’s Daily Star Online, Egyptian engineer Ismail Hamad claims the first picture of Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah published after the plane’s disappearance was a “hint as to where the plane was being held”.

Ismail claims a photo which shows Zaharie’s family seated on a sofa with a blue patterned cover is a reference to an archipelago of islands in the Philippines where the pilot had presumably flown the plane.

“If the pilot of the plane, Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah, is the one who planned and carried out the hiding of the aircraft from radars and human eyes as rumoured, I think he leaked to us a coded message symbolising the place of hiding in the first pictures leaked to the world of him at home,” Ismail told Daily Star Online in an article published today.

“That pattern drawn on the sofa symbolises an archipelago.

“As if he wants to say that whoever wants to find me and the plane, he should look for me on an island of some archipelago and not in the ocean,” he said.

None of the theories about the disappearance of MH370 – including a hijack attempt by Zaharie, the plane being hijacked as part of a terror plot, or taken to a Russian facility as an effort by President Vladimir Putin to intimidate the West amid an escalating crisis in Ukraine – has been substantiated.

Although a few fragments reportedly from the jet have been found on western Indian Ocean shores, search efforts for MH370 officially ended last year.