What Nurul Izzah’s resignation says about the New Malaysia

A novice like me has finally come to terms with Malaysian politics: it is a system based on elitism, and has nothing much to do with altruism or egalitarianism.

It is about politicians trying their best to get into power and then dissect among themselves how to share the spoils. The welfare of the people and the interest of the nation are at most secondary, if not incidental.

They talk and behave very differently before attaining power. They also talk and behave very differently after losing power. But when in power, the intoxication of it overrides everything.

I don’t know the real reason Nurul Izzah Anwar resigned from her party positions. I don’t know for sure why she decided to opt out of federal government duties. But whatever the reason, I think it is a wake-up call.

It is a reminder that Pakatan Harapan, not just PKR politicians, have lost their ideals and zeal for reform. She must be peeved by the same old politics of baloney now seeping into the centrum of PH. Everyone is staying quiet like the three wise monkeys – see, hear and speak no evil of the baloney that happens in our midst every day. I suggest we stop condemning Umno/Barisan Nasional (BN) politicians for doing the same in the past.

I apologise if I wrongly diagnose Nurul Izzah’s reasons for resigning. After all, I am just an ordinary citizen trying to make sense of the events unfolding each day.

Do you know what the favourite term of PH ministers and politicians is now? It is “next quarter”, “next year”, “next five years” and “in 10, 20 years”. From foreign workers, toll renegotiation, PTPTN loans, education reforms, Teoh Beng Hock, Lynas, Taman Rimba, internet tariffs, Altantuya and Indira Gandhi’s case to Pastor Raymond Koh – everything is under perpetual study and consideration.

In terms of the “New Malaysia”, I think we have yet to take even one genuine step forward. Instead, we are regressing and are beset with pipe dreams to be realised perhaps in “10 to 20 years”, not unlike the TN50 hawked by Umno/BN before this.

Instead of focusing on national issues, PH is now preoccupied with horse trading. Its leaders want to form committees to vet opposition politicians, MPs and assemblymen who wish to join the coalition. But do they really have the means and intention of knowing who committed the crimes, abuse of power and corruption? Have PH component parties become MACC or the police? To me, all this is just a farce.

Why can’t PH component parties grow by recruiting ordinary citizens? Why can’t they allow those who have slogged for years to play a greater role in the party?

To me, it is obvious that they want to get more horses in their stable by enticing opposition MPs and representatives to join them. They want to lay claim to the seats occupied by these individuals when the next general election comes along.

We shouldn’t ignore the obvious. It is hypocritical and deceitful of us if we do.

TK Chua is an FMT reader.

The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of FMT.